I agree with everything you said. I think the trick is to convey those concerns when discussing what work will be needed. Everyone will have concerns but if you come across as too needy or pushy they may think you will be a pain in the butt homeowner. I have seen this before where you have to come back 3 or 4 times for something not dealing with the work, but you are trying to be polite and helpful for business. Word of mouth is the best way to get more buisness, in my opinion.
Some homeowners love pedestal sinks. Others still like the feel of carpet near the sink. We can not change our personal taste and as such, it must be considered throughout any bathroom remodeling project. Therefore, don’t be afraid to throw in a personal touch or two. If you want an orange accent wall, go for it. Just remember, you may have to paint over it the day it comes time to sell.
The remodel is needed due to water leakage from the tub surround into the wall cavity. I recommended she get an estimate of extra costs that cannot be foreseen until demolition occurs but would be entailed if the contractor has to do any structural work like putting in new studs and or has to install new insulation. I urged her to get at least an upper ceiling estimate before work begins lest the contractor make her an offer she can't refuse once the room is gutted. I urged her to be flexible on any adjustment to the estimate that can be made only after demolition begins. But I told her to insist that the rest of the estimate be binding. No surprises.

It's totally legitimate for a professional to charge you for a design, at least in some situations. If the contractor has a book of ready-made designs and just pulled one out to show you, then you're right that s/he shouldn't charge you. But if someone does a design that conforms to your room's dimensions, with the features that you want, then that person has invested time in creating a work product. Some contractors and architects think that's just the cost of doing business, but many others consider that their time is worth something, and they charge for it. You just need to let contractors know that you're not looking for that kind of custom work, and not willing to pay for it.
New to this site. My first thought is to the "DIY throw a bathroom together in a weekend" comment makers. Your comments about how much it cost you 2,000 to do a bathroom in your home correctly or incorrectly without a picture of the finished product is invalid in this forum. I had a customer spend 2k on a complete vanity, dumb comment. Second, I've agreed to the home owner supplying all the materials (one time mistake) and it was a total disaster after getting into the project. We know what we need when we go for supplies....plain and simple. A homeowner that purchases materials for a remodel they CAN'T handle for a contractor that CAN complete the task is like a mechanic ordering a transmission for a rear brake job....irresponsible. A good contractor listens to his customers, is given a budget, and decides if it is profitable for his company. If we give you a $7,000 price for a bathroom and you think it should be done for $5,000, I encourage the customer to get 2 more bids. I have faith in the quality of work I do, and if the customer doesn't see that from the very beginning, the transaction will be a nightmare. "JOE" your comment stuck out because its the unseen labor hours of modifying the old to fit the new that customers don't and will not ever understand. If you want something done right in your beautiful home, have the money set aside and then hire a contractor you trust to make your happy.

I agree with everything you said. I think the trick is to convey those concerns when discussing what work will be needed. Everyone will have concerns but if you come across as too needy or pushy they may think you will be a pain in the butt homeowner. I have seen this before where you have to come back 3 or 4 times for something not dealing with the work, but you are trying to be polite and helpful for business. Word of mouth is the best way to get more buisness, in my opinion.
As you can imagine, there is a lot you can do in your bathroom, no matter how small or large it is. While the average bathroom remodeling cost is just under $8,500, we have seen simple installation projects run as low as $268 for a bathroom mirror. To ensure you get the best possible price from a bathrom contractor, you must do your research and always get multiple quotes for your specific project. In addition, you must bear in mind a few other cost factors that can increase or decrease the total bathroom renovation price.
Between the two options, pick up one tile design that suits your necessity and budget. Remember to put forward safety for your children in this point. In case your budget is limited, you can partially change the tile. Determine which part of the bathroom that needs new, safer tiles. This will definitely save more money compared to overall tile changing.
It's so competitive out there. I am a Long Island contractor and I be realized lately that clients give you an impression when you give them there costs that you are doing something wrong. I've been in this Busines about 20 years and that avg cost is right there. Also homeowners should also realize if us contractors are using subs for our plumbing and electrical our costs are hire than the guy doing all the work himself. I only used licensed contractors for all my remodeling work. 
×