If you are just updating a bathroom, you will probably not need plumbing or electrical work. Since this article is referenced to a small bathroom, the costs here are way too high for labor unless you are in Manhattan. $9k for general labor is insane. A small bathroom should cost you $1-2k labor for reframing, concrete board, tile, toilet, vanity and accessories install. Texture and paint should be another $400-600 tops for a SMALL bathroom.


To give you more of an idea of what you'll pay before a contractor gives you an estimate, here are several cost examples for remodels of different size bathrooms, provided by Thumbtack Pro Viewpoint NW, a bathroom remodeler in Vancouver, Washington. Keep in mind each job was specific to that house. The total cost of each project includes all material and labor costs:
Yeah, I feel your pain. I'm in Alabama, one of the lowest income states in the country, and I got a quote from a "big box" hardware store here. $39,000 -- to remodel a 9 x 12 bathroom. I won't go into the details but I'll tell you that the estimate included $3600 for electrical work. Uhh, we are simply switching out 2 'regular' outlets and putting in $20-dollar GFI outlets. The wiring is fine (I know because I've been in the wall before). So don't go to the "big box" stores unless you want the highest possible estimate (oh, yeah ... I had to pay for the estimate as well).
It's so competitive out there. I am a Long Island contractor and I be realized lately that clients give you an impression when you give them there costs that you are doing something wrong. I've been in this Busines about 20 years and that avg cost is right there. Also homeowners should also realize if us contractors are using subs for our plumbing and electrical our costs are hire than the guy doing all the work himself. I only used licensed contractors for all my remodeling work.
We'll take a deeper dive into current bathroom trends later on, but one such is adding modern metallic features. Luckily, updating your hardware is an effortless way to add visual interest and style to any room. However, if you prefer standard hardware and don’t plan on selling anytime soon, just know that you have to live with the update. Don’t add something if you’re going to be miserable using it. While it could bring in more money down the line, the update is simply not worth it.

Interior bathroom demolition costs $1,000 to $2,300. Prices can go higher if you’re removing and moving walls to create a different footprint. For the experienced DIYer, this is a good place to save money by doing it yourself or assisting the contractor. However, demo can get expensive quickly if you take out a load bearing wall, cut electrical lines or break a water pipe. Avoid the risk by hiring a pro.
If you want a small addition that can improve your bathroom in a big way, consider buying and installing a bath fan. This will reduce humidity in the room, eliminate odors and remove moisture from the air. If you already have a bath fan and the wiring is in place, then you can expect to pay a very reasonable $150 for the installation work. If there is no current space for the fan, however, your cost might be closer to $800.
With this article being close to 2 years old, I can easily say it is WAAAAYYYY out of date and couldn’t be farther from current outcomes. While some of the occurrences with the difficulty in getting responses from contractors might still be the same, the dollar figures are multiples off! My wife and I have been researching a modest renovation on our master bath (mid70’s colonial MB that was updated once before) and have reached out to multiple contractors over that timeframe. Each time, our revelation into the exhorbitant costs are proof enough we’re not asking either the right questions or the right contractors. The dissapointment in hearing the $30k minimum and 45$k midpoint (again...midpoint) for our studs to simple remodel are enough to send us into the nether-regions of misunderstanding and annoyance and the same time.
Interior bathroom demolition costs $1,000 to $2,300. Prices can go higher if you’re removing and moving walls to create a different footprint. For the experienced DIYer, this is a good place to save money by doing it yourself or assisting the contractor. However, demo can get expensive quickly if you take out a load bearing wall, cut electrical lines or break a water pipe. Avoid the risk by hiring a pro.
I just renovated a 6X12 bathroom. Old cast iron tub removed. Removed and saved existing vanity and vanity top. Removed the toilet and replaced the existing rotten flooring and added on to the existing partially rotten floor joist. Removed the drywall and tile from around the old tub. After the new flooring was in I had to modify the existing plumbing to accommodate the new tub and shower surround. The hot and cold water lines had to be raised to fit the surround because the new tub is taller and the drains had to be installed and moved to fit the new tub. Drywall was finished and painted. New faucets,New tub,Tub Surround, and flooring materials were purchased by the home owner. Labor cost was 4,584.00

Everyone wants to save money, but when you start by questioning material costs or markups it can indicate that you may be under budgeting for the project, or will question every choice the contractor makes in the hopes of saving $100. Time is money and when you have a customer who may cause interruptions because they want to buy something themselves to avoid "markup" it can cause major delays. Many times a customer ends up getting the wrong material anyway. This again slows down a contractor that may already be too busy.
For a small bathroom of roughly 100 square feet, labor costs could run an average of $12,000 or $13,000 on the high end. This would include the labor to completely redo tile, completely install new fixtures, complete any necessary wiring and plumbing, and have everything inspected afterward. Never overlook the importance of having your wiring and plumbing inspected directly after the contractors finish. This can end up saving you a lot of money on repairs in the long run.
With the layout in place, you can begin to think about design. Collect images of bathrooms you like, and then find the common themes to determine your style. Are you a fan of modern bathroom design or is a country-cottage bathroom more your style? Do you love the crisp, clean look of a white bathroom or is a bold, brilliant red bathroom more appealing? Heading to the store with a clear vision will make it much easier to whittle down the choices for cabinets, hardware, and other finishes.

Some of the new trends in master bath remodels, according to the NKBA’s 2019 Trend Report, include in-floor heating, app-enabled controls for radiant floors and digital shower valves, floating cabinetry, high-gloss and textured melamine looks, wet rooms with tubs and showers in the same room and a drain in floor and black frames as shower focal points. Transitional-style master bathrooms are currently the most popular bath style at 59% of bathroom remodels, says NKBA, with traditional baths a close second.
I’m mostly done with a renovation on a small bathroom with a tub. Once I knew what was staying what was going that made figureing the costs much easier. Estimated costs for everything I would need for almost a year. I budgetted about $1,800. I figure I have another $500 in expenses to finish. Saved alot on doing most of the work and hiring for the electrical and plummbing. Hint, if you make the problem assesible it makes the job cheaper.
If someone was to come at us with their own additional contract, we would probably decide that we had given them enough of our time and move on. As Nick mentions below, the contractors reputation is the one on the line. They have every reason to do right by you. The crooks of the world generally don't have a reputation to stand on, and as a customer it is your job to research who you are hiring. If you can't find anything about them, they probably aren't who you want to be dealing with. If they ask for money upfront, they probably aren't running a stable outfit. We never take a penny upfront. We collect when the job is fully complete even when we are working on weeks long projects.
It's so competitive out there. I am a Long Island contractor and I be realized lately that clients give you an impression when you give them there costs that you are doing something wrong. I've been in this Busines about 20 years and that avg cost is right there. Also homeowners should also realize if us contractors are using subs for our plumbing and electrical our costs are hire than the guy doing all the work himself. I only used licensed contractors for all my remodeling work.
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