I have a miserably small master bath with a particle board subfloor (house built 1969), so I must guy it. I bought toilet made for small bathrooms, and plan to pull the cabinet sink, replace with pedestal, raise storage like lighted bulkhead, demolish tile, and widen doorway from 28" to 32". I might gain 6" from tile removal alone, plus but another 6" on entrance with cabinet sink removal. Since large expense is in demolition, I could do that. But, install showers is tricky given the drain leveling so I'll hire a pro for that. Question: gutting, updating and repairing master bath is necessary, but to what extent should I go i, terms of resizing, which would entail bumping out wall into adjoining small room, which then adds expense of finishing that where window placement restricts encroachment. It's a nice older brick house that I bought before I realized the made of lapses and oversights by the home inspector (who also is a local top police official in a town with highly subjective law enforcement). I need to fix, list, well and leave. Any thoughts (and prayers much appreciated).
I can't even get anyone to look and give an estimate to complete a bathroom remodel- just the bathtub/shower part has to be done as the last person who was doing it died- the rest is complete and have all the items and materials already and paid for. once they hear that they are no longer intrested- what do they expect? me to let them rip out what was already done and repay and redone everything all over again so they get more money? and throw out brand new imported Travertine and Spanish tile?

As the home owner, I am providing about $8,000 in materials. This includes the cabinetry, fixtures, faucets, countertops, lighting, toilet, glass in-line shower door and tile. Received two quotes. One contractor wants $25,000 to demo the bathroom, convert the existing tub to a tiled walk-in shower, tile the floor, and install my materials. The other wants $27,000. Using the previously mentioned 60/40 labor to material rate, I would be paying more than double for labor...that's insane. Some contractor's need a reality check.
For a small bathroom of roughly 100 square feet, labor costs could run an average of $12,000 or $13,000 on the high end. This would include the labor to completely redo tile, completely install new fixtures, complete any necessary wiring and plumbing, and have everything inspected afterward. Never overlook the importance of having your wiring and plumbing inspected directly after the contractors finish. This can end up saving you a lot of money on repairs in the long run.
Hiring a plumber and skilled workers for important tasks is a must to make the planned new bathroom well-fit. Other than that, you can actually save money if you do minor tasks as mentioned before. In addition to those assignments, you can paint the newly-redesigned bathroom. You can work together with your wife to decorate it. Or you can even invite your children to select which items to be put in it.
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With the layout in place, you can begin to think about design. Collect images of bathrooms you like, and then find the common themes to determine your style. Are you a fan of modern bathroom design or is a country-cottage bathroom more your style? Do you love the crisp, clean look of a white bathroom or is a bold, brilliant red bathroom more appealing? Heading to the store with a clear vision will make it much easier to whittle down the choices for cabinets, hardware, and other finishes.
I’m mostly done with a renovation on a small bathroom with a tub. Once I knew what was staying what was going that made figureing the costs much easier. Estimated costs for everything I would need for almost a year. I budgetted about $1,800. I figure I have another $500 in expenses to finish. Saved alot on doing most of the work and hiring for the electrical and plummbing. Hint, if you make the problem assesible it makes the job cheaper.
I just renovated a 6X12 bathroom. Old cast iron tub removed. Removed and saved existing vanity and vanity top. Removed the toilet and replaced the existing rotten flooring and added on to the existing partially rotten floor joist. Removed the drywall and tile from around the old tub. After the new flooring was in I had to modify the existing plumbing to accommodate the new tub and shower surround. The hot and cold water lines had to be raised to fit the surround because the new tub is taller and the drains had to be installed and moved to fit the new tub. Drywall was finished and painted. New faucets,New tub,Tub Surround, and flooring materials were purchased by the home owner. Labor cost was 4,584.00

As I contractor if I am installing a customers product or supplying my own, I am charging full overhead and profit above the install cost. I try not to allow customers to supply materials and when they do I tack on my overhead and profit in to the labor. Remodeling is one of the most time consuming services and if your not covering your overhead and profit in the materials and labor you will not last long in this business. At the end of the day after all said and done, making a 15% profit is respectable. Think about it, your the designer, the gofer, the physiatrist, the builder, shopper and the banker until you get paid. Never be intimidated to support your price, deliver a quality product and support it with proper pricing. Never let the customer supply there own materials. Movie theaters don't let you bring in your own pop corn, so why should contractors be any different.


To give you more of an idea of what you'll pay before a contractor gives you an estimate, here are several cost examples for remodels of different size bathrooms, provided by Thumbtack Pro Viewpoint NW, a bathroom remodeler in Vancouver, Washington. Keep in mind each job was specific to that house. The total cost of each project includes all material and labor costs:
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