If you’re suffering from sticker shock, don’t worry. Bathroom remodeling isn’t all or nothing. You can cut down on bathroom remodel costs by going one step at a time. A bathroom can still benefit from new lighting or ventilation updates followed by a new bathroom vanity or granite countertops. You can always upgrade some features later down the road.
The average cost to gut and demolish a bathroom is $400 to $2,000. Prices depend on the room size, type of materials, which fixtures are being removed, if walls are being demolished, and if any damage is found in the subflooring or inner wall structure. You can DIY to save money, but hire a professional to inspect your electrical wiring and plumbing.

If you are just updating a bathroom, you will probably not need plumbing or electrical work. Since this article is referenced to a small bathroom, the costs here are way too high for labor unless you are in Manhattan. $9k for general labor is insane. A small bathroom should cost you $1-2k labor for reframing, concrete board, tile, toilet, vanity and accessories install. Texture and paint should be another $400-600 tops for a SMALL bathroom.


Buying a new toilet might not be exciting, but it is necessary during most bathroom remodels. The major expense here, as you might guess, will be the price of the toilet itself. If you can deliver the toilet to your home by yourself, then the installation cost will be minimal. On average, the cost of a new toilet, as well as installation, comes in between $360 and $492.
My suggestion is when talking to contractor be subtle and ask your questions. Ask if he/she will have a dumpster or trailer to haul away debris. If the don't get dumpster or have a trailer then you probably don't want them to work on your home. Tell them your concern with the only toilet in the house. Unless it is not safe I have always reinstalled the toilet so it could be used at night. A good contractor will work with you in anyway possible because you are the key to more business.
When it comes to cabinet installation, the overall cost depends on two key factors: materials and DIY or professional installation. Needless to say, if you use basic materials or stock cabinets over custom cabinets and higher-end materials, the overall cost will be less. In fact, custom cabinets can cost as much as $500 more per cabinet. If you’re installing more than five cabinets, that price difference really comes into play. Nonetheless, if you hire a contractor, expect to pay roughly $4,000 for the entire cabinet project.

Top that with contractors that don’t even provide a drawings, plans or official documentation of their intent and we can see where their seemingly in control of the market. Their swagger is even more overloaded when they’re excited to come view your home yet can’t call you back week after week months later because they’re too busy to even consider your meager $30-50k one-room remodel.
It's totally legitimate for a professional to charge you for a design, at least in some situations. If the contractor has a book of ready-made designs and just pulled one out to show you, then you're right that s/he shouldn't charge you. But if someone does a design that conforms to your room's dimensions, with the features that you want, then that person has invested time in creating a work product. Some contractors and architects think that's just the cost of doing business, but many others consider that their time is worth something, and they charge for it. You just need to let contractors know that you're not looking for that kind of custom work, and not willing to pay for it.

Hiring a plumber and skilled workers for important tasks is a must to make the planned new bathroom well-fit. Other than that, you can actually save money if you do minor tasks as mentioned before. In addition to those assignments, you can paint the newly-redesigned bathroom. You can work together with your wife to decorate it. Or you can even invite your children to select which items to be put in it.
You want a company that has time for you and has long-term relationships with its subcontractors. Make sure you and your contractor have the same expectations about how often they will be onsite once the remodel or renovation kicks off. The contractor should be open with you about how long each stage of the project will take, and they should show a good understanding of what factors could potentially push that timeline out.
I’m in the middle of a small bathroom remodel. Shower only-no tub. I thought I was ready for this, but so many things have come up I didn’t count on. I paid $5000 for all supplies and in stock fixtures at Lowes–just basic stuff. I did have to order a shower kit because the builder thought it would save some labor time. It was high–$3200. The builder charges $50 an hour (includes him and his helper). He estimated his costs between 5 and 7 thousand. My house is 35 years old so he has had to do a lot of work to accommodate the new fixtures. I had an old lighted medicine cabinet so he had to rewire for the new lights. My vanity was too high so he had to move the electrical outlet. Because my attic above the shower had moisture in it, he had to vent the shower to the outside. He had to replace all the subflooring and a lot of the rotted insulation on the sides of the bathroom (leaky roof) . Anyway, it looks like my bathroom remodel is going to be around 10 or 11 thousand. I wish now I hadn’t ordered the shower kit with the fancy tile.
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