I just renovated a 6X12 bathroom. Old cast iron tub removed. Removed and saved existing vanity and vanity top. Removed the toilet and replaced the existing rotten flooring and added on to the existing partially rotten floor joist. Removed the drywall and tile from around the old tub. After the new flooring was in I had to modify the existing plumbing to accommodate the new tub and shower surround. The hot and cold water lines had to be raised to fit the surround because the new tub is taller and the drains had to be installed and moved to fit the new tub. Drywall was finished and painted. New faucets,New tub,Tub Surround, and flooring materials were purchased by the home owner. Labor cost was 4,584.00
To give you more of an idea of what you'll pay before a contractor gives you an estimate, here are several cost examples for remodels of different size bathrooms, provided by Thumbtack Pro Viewpoint NW, a bathroom remodeler in Vancouver, Washington. Keep in mind each job was specific to that house. The total cost of each project includes all material and labor costs:
You’ll spend $3,000 to $8,000 on the typical remodel. Anywhere from 40 to 65 percent of a bath upgrade cost comes from labor. However, doing any project yourself means no insurance and added fees if something goes wrong. Hire a professional for any work you’re not comfortable doing, such as the plumbing and electrical. Consider the pros and cons of DIY vs professional bathroom remodeling.

I acted as general contractor and did all my own demo to remodel my 6x8 bathroom. I hired subs individually to do most of the work - an electrician, a plumber, a drywall guy and a tile guy. I painted the walls and the ceiling. I replaced everything except the cast iron tub. Materials and fixtures cost around $2000 and labor was about $3000. My subs had no problem with me supplying the materials, because I discussed their job scope in advance. This project took 6 months but I did have another full bath to use in the mean time.


Interior bathroom demolition costs $1,000 to $2,300. Prices can go higher if you’re removing and moving walls to create a different footprint. For the experienced DIYer, this is a good place to save money by doing it yourself or assisting the contractor. However, demo can get expensive quickly if you take out a load bearing wall, cut electrical lines or break a water pipe. Avoid the risk by hiring a pro.
A sun tube, also known as a solar tube, is an ingenious device that you install between the attic rafters. These flexible tubes range from about 10 inches in diameter up to more than 20 inches, and they funnel natural sunlight down to your bathroom from a small opening cut into the roof. Sun tubes cost between $200 and $400, compared to the $1,500 you'd likely spend on a double-paned window or skylight.
A sun tube, also known as a solar tube, is an ingenious device that you install between the attic rafters. These flexible tubes range from about 10 inches in diameter up to more than 20 inches, and they funnel natural sunlight down to your bathroom from a small opening cut into the roof. Sun tubes cost between $200 and $400, compared to the $1,500 you'd likely spend on a double-paned window or skylight.
It's totally legitimate for a professional to charge you for a design, at least in some situations. If the contractor has a book of ready-made designs and just pulled one out to show you, then you're right that s/he shouldn't charge you. But if someone does a design that conforms to your room's dimensions, with the features that you want, then that person has invested time in creating a work product. Some contractors and architects think that's just the cost of doing business, but many others consider that their time is worth something, and they charge for it. You just need to let contractors know that you're not looking for that kind of custom work, and not willing to pay for it.

20% labor price ---out of the question----I'm a Building Contractor, If you are totally remodeling a bathroom, where is the cost for demo of existing???? Demo can easily run an extra 10%- factors: 1) Age of existing---many factors here to adjust price, 2) Accessibility ---Getting materials out of and to the bathroom, and protecting present surroundings of owner. 3) Cost to dispose of debris 4) Where is the Contractor's O & P ???

A DIY demo does still require some planning. For one, you'll need the right tools: likely a sledgehammer, a large crowbar, a pry bar, and an old claw hammer you don't mind ruining. Make sure you know what's behind the walls—especially electrical wiring and water pipes—before you start swinging. Finally, don't assume your demo won't cost anything. In addition to tools, you'll probably need to rent a dumpster or hire a hauling service to cart away debris.
You’ll spend $3,000 to $8,000 on the typical remodel. Anywhere from 40 to 65 percent of a bath upgrade cost comes from labor. However, doing any project yourself means no insurance and added fees if something goes wrong. Hire a professional for any work you’re not comfortable doing, such as the plumbing and electrical. Consider the pros and cons of DIY vs professional bathroom remodeling.
New to this site. My first thought is to the "DIY throw a bathroom together in a weekend" comment makers. Your comments about how much it cost you 2,000 to do a bathroom in your home correctly or incorrectly without a picture of the finished product is invalid in this forum. I had a customer spend 2k on a complete vanity, dumb comment. Second, I've agreed to the home owner supplying all the materials (one time mistake) and it was a total disaster after getting into the project. We know what we need when we go for supplies....plain and simple. A homeowner that purchases materials for a remodel they CAN'T handle for a contractor that CAN complete the task is like a mechanic ordering a transmission for a rear brake job....irresponsible. A good contractor listens to his customers, is given a budget, and decides if it is profitable for his company. If we give you a $7,000 price for a bathroom and you think it should be done for $5,000, I encourage the customer to get 2 more bids. I have faith in the quality of work I do, and if the customer doesn't see that from the very beginning, the transaction will be a nightmare. "JOE" your comment stuck out because its the unseen labor hours of modifying the old to fit the new that customers don't and will not ever understand. If you want something done right in your beautiful home, have the money set aside and then hire a contractor you trust to make your happy.
For yourself, having fresh flowers in the planned new bathroom is small thing that can brighten every morning. Lightening candles in the planned new bathroom is also a simple aspect whenever you get into the room feeling so tired. Taking a bath with dimly-lighted candles will hopefully put your minds at rest, brings calmness to your head thus feels so fresh after that.
I agree with everything you said. I think the trick is to convey those concerns when discussing what work will be needed. Everyone will have concerns but if you come across as too needy or pushy they may think you will be a pain in the butt homeowner. I have seen this before where you have to come back 3 or 4 times for something not dealing with the work, but you are trying to be polite and helpful for business. Word of mouth is the best way to get more buisness, in my opinion.
As you might imagine, I once had to sue a contractor. He demanded payments up front during different stages of work replacing a roof and front porch on my house. When he wanted to cheap out and use inferior materials, i insisted he do the job to specifications I had provided to him in writing beforehand. He walked away from the job, half completed, and I had to hire someone else to finish it. I recovered most, but not all, of the money he had stolen.
I acted as general contractor and did all my own demo to remodel my 6x8 bathroom. I hired subs individually to do most of the work - an electrician, a plumber, a drywall guy and a tile guy. I painted the walls and the ceiling. I replaced everything except the cast iron tub. Materials and fixtures cost around $2000 and labor was about $3000. My subs had no problem with me supplying the materials, because I discussed their job scope in advance. This project took 6 months but I did have another full bath to use in the mean time.
It's so competitive out there. I am a Long Island contractor and I be realized lately that clients give you an impression when you give them there costs that you are doing something wrong. I've been in this Busines about 20 years and that avg cost is right there. Also homeowners should also realize if us contractors are using subs for our plumbing and electrical our costs are hire than the guy doing all the work himself. I only used licensed contractors for all my remodeling work.
×