For a small bathroom of roughly 100 square feet, labor costs could run an average of $12,000 or $13,000 on the high end. This would include the labor to completely redo tile, completely install new fixtures, complete any necessary wiring and plumbing, and have everything inspected afterward. Never overlook the importance of having your wiring and plumbing inspected directly after the contractors finish. This can end up saving you a lot of money on repairs in the long run.

A punitive approach to what could be unforseen and atypical delays may be a bad idea. I would suggest offering a bonus for the job being completed early rather than a penalty for it being delayed. If material is ordered, we can't make it arrive faster if something delays the shipment. We recently ordered a bathtub requested by a customer. It was promised by our supplier for a Wednesday delivery. Bad weather hit Texas and it just didn't leave the warehouse until the following Monday. It blew up our schedule for the project and it wasn't anyone's fault or mistake. If we have an employee critical to the project get sick or injured, we may not be able to get things done as originally scheduled. Jobs can get off schedule for a lot of reasons outside the contractor's control. Charging them for those things is likely to turn them away.
I can't even get anyone to look and give an estimate to complete a bathroom remodel- just the bathtub/shower part has to be done as the last person who was doing it died- the rest is complete and have all the items and materials already and paid for. once they hear that they are no longer intrested- what do they expect? me to let them rip out what was already done and repay and redone everything all over again so they get more money? and throw out brand new imported Travertine and Spanish tile?
As the home owner, I am providing about $8,000 in materials. This includes the cabinetry, fixtures, faucets, countertops, lighting, toilet, glass in-line shower door and tile. Received two quotes. One contractor wants $25,000 to demo the bathroom, convert the existing tub to a tiled walk-in shower, tile the floor, and install my materials. The other wants $27,000. Using the previously mentioned 60/40 labor to material rate, I would be paying more than double for labor...that's insane. Some contractor's need a reality check.
Using the ultra-trendy animal skull as a main focus point, this space definitely stands out from the rest of the usual white and boring contemporary bathrooms. Notice how the tiny, delicate bare branch echoes and contrasts the strong antlers on the wall, and how the pendant light hangs right in the middle of the negative space provided by the antlers.
The remodel is needed due to water leakage from the tub surround into the wall cavity. I recommended she get an estimate of extra costs that cannot be foreseen until demolition occurs but would be entailed if the contractor has to do any structural work like putting in new studs and or has to install new insulation. I urged her to get at least an upper ceiling estimate before work begins lest the contractor make her an offer she can't refuse once the room is gutted. I urged her to be flexible on any adjustment to the estimate that can be made only after demolition begins. But I told her to insist that the rest of the estimate be binding. No surprises.
And industry trends bear out this desire for bigger, or just better, master baths. According to the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA) homeowners undertaking bathroom renovations are spending the most on master bathrooms with an average budget of $32,000 (including materials and labor). That’s more than twice what is spent on a powder room remodel. That average cost, however, is dependent upon a host of factors including the scope of the remodel, whether you are using luxury or standard fixtures, where you live and other considerations.

New to this site. My first thought is to the "DIY throw a bathroom together in a weekend" comment makers. Your comments about how much it cost you 2,000 to do a bathroom in your home correctly or incorrectly without a picture of the finished product is invalid in this forum. I had a customer spend 2k on a complete vanity, dumb comment. Second, I've agreed to the home owner supplying all the materials (one time mistake) and it was a total disaster after getting into the project. We know what we need when we go for supplies....plain and simple. A homeowner that purchases materials for a remodel they CAN'T handle for a contractor that CAN complete the task is like a mechanic ordering a transmission for a rear brake job....irresponsible. A good contractor listens to his customers, is given a budget, and decides if it is profitable for his company. If we give you a $7,000 price for a bathroom and you think it should be done for $5,000, I encourage the customer to get 2 more bids. I have faith in the quality of work I do, and if the customer doesn't see that from the very beginning, the transaction will be a nightmare. "JOE" your comment stuck out because its the unseen labor hours of modifying the old to fit the new that customers don't and will not ever understand. If you want something done right in your beautiful home, have the money set aside and then hire a contractor you trust to make your happy.
What activities will be done in the various parts of the room? For example, will you require a place to sit and apply makeup? Will the room also house laundry facilities? What activities can be done in a shared space, and which require a private area? Do you prefer separate shower and bath areas? Would you like a tub that accommodates more than one person? Do you want the water closet in its own compartment?
Buying a new toilet might not be exciting, but it is necessary during most bathroom remodels. The major expense here, as you might guess, will be the price of the toilet itself. If you can deliver the toilet to your home by yourself, then the installation cost will be minimal. On average, the cost of a new toilet, as well as installation, comes in between $360 and $492.

A DIY demo does still require some planning. For one, you'll need the right tools: likely a sledgehammer, a large crowbar, a pry bar, and an old claw hammer you don't mind ruining. Make sure you know what's behind the walls—especially electrical wiring and water pipes—before you start swinging. Finally, don't assume your demo won't cost anything. In addition to tools, you'll probably need to rent a dumpster or hire a hauling service to cart away debris.
The things that may scare someone away is agreeing on cost and deadline before they could know what they are getting into. The last thing they want is for this job to cost them money. I think a good way to talk about deadline and reimbursement it to tell them your concerns. Be honest, tell them it is costing you time and money having to shower somewhere else. Ask them if it would be possible to be reimbursed if it goes over deadline. If they agree put it in contract. What I think the trick is, is to bring up the topic and let it be their idea or have them agree to an idea rather than coming to them with something seeming like demands. Offer a drink or something, seem friendly and easy to work with. Kindness goes a long way. Their reputation is on the line not yours.
Some homeowners love pedestal sinks. Others still like the feel of carpet near the sink. We can not change our personal taste and as such, it must be considered throughout any bathroom remodeling project. Therefore, don’t be afraid to throw in a personal touch or two. If you want an orange accent wall, go for it. Just remember, you may have to paint over it the day it comes time to sell.

However, if you plan to add more square footage to your bathroom, that's where the expenses can really add up. Expanding the size of an existing small bathroom increases the total cost of a bathroom renovation project and lengthens the job's timeline. Some expansions may require permits, too, which may cost an additional fee and take time to secure.
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