New to this site. My first thought is to the "DIY throw a bathroom together in a weekend" comment makers. Your comments about how much it cost you 2,000 to do a bathroom in your home correctly or incorrectly without a picture of the finished product is invalid in this forum. I had a customer spend 2k on a complete vanity, dumb comment. Second, I've agreed to the home owner supplying all the materials (one time mistake) and it was a total disaster after getting into the project. We know what we need when we go for supplies....plain and simple. A homeowner that purchases materials for a remodel they CAN'T handle for a contractor that CAN complete the task is like a mechanic ordering a transmission for a rear brake job....irresponsible. A good contractor listens to his customers, is given a budget, and decides if it is profitable for his company. If we give you a $7,000 price for a bathroom and you think it should be done for $5,000, I encourage the customer to get 2 more bids. I have faith in the quality of work I do, and if the customer doesn't see that from the very beginning, the transaction will be a nightmare. "JOE" your comment stuck out because its the unseen labor hours of modifying the old to fit the new that customers don't and will not ever understand. If you want something done right in your beautiful home, have the money set aside and then hire a contractor you trust to make your happy.
The average bathroom remodel costs $10,446 Most homeowners spend between $5,977 and $14,926. You can spend as little as $3,500 to $7,000 updating the essentials in a small or medium-sized bathroom. On a large or master bath, you could spend $25,000 or more. Labor averages 50 percent of the total project price at about $65 per hour. Expect pricing to vary regionally up to 20 percent due mainly to labor. Material prices stay roughly the same across the country.
Who doesn’t want a bathroom oasis in their home; a place to soak away the day’s troubles in a pedestal tub, heated floors for chilly mornings or organized makeup drawers in your vanity to keep all of your supplies close at hand? We spend a lot of time in our bathrooms and it makes sense that homeowners would want to make their master bath the most functional, restful and luxurious space possible.

The things that may scare someone away is agreeing on cost and deadline before they could know what they are getting into. The last thing they want is for this job to cost them money. I think a good way to talk about deadline and reimbursement it to tell them your concerns. Be honest, tell them it is costing you time and money having to shower somewhere else. Ask them if it would be possible to be reimbursed if it goes over deadline. If they agree put it in contract. What I think the trick is, is to bring up the topic and let it be their idea or have them agree to an idea rather than coming to them with something seeming like demands. Offer a drink or something, seem friendly and easy to work with. Kindness goes a long way. Their reputation is on the line not yours.
I acted as general contractor and did all my own demo to remodel my 6x8 bathroom. I hired subs individually to do most of the work - an electrician, a plumber, a drywall guy and a tile guy. I painted the walls and the ceiling. I replaced everything except the cast iron tub. Materials and fixtures cost around $2000 and labor was about $3000. My subs had no problem with me supplying the materials, because I discussed their job scope in advance. This project took 6 months but I did have another full bath to use in the mean time.
As a contractor I can tell you that most reputable contractors probably don't need your job, and if you make things too complicated or troublesome, they will move on to other jobs that don't throw up red flags. Much of what you ask for here is reasonable, but bringing a second contract into the equation can set of some alarms that you may be a difficult customer to work with or even a litigiously minded person who is likely to try and bring a lawsuit whether deserved or not. Anything you want covered should be in the original contract.

I’m in the middle of a small bathroom remodel. Shower only-no tub. I thought I was ready for this, but so many things have come up I didn’t count on. I paid $5000 for all supplies and in stock fixtures at Lowes–just basic stuff. I did have to order a shower kit because the builder thought it would save some labor time. It was high–$3200. The builder charges $50 an hour (includes him and his helper). He estimated his costs between 5 and 7 thousand. My house is 35 years old so he has had to do a lot of work to accommodate the new fixtures. I had an old lighted medicine cabinet so he had to rewire for the new lights. My vanity was too high so he had to move the electrical outlet. Because my attic above the shower had moisture in it, he had to vent the shower to the outside. He had to replace all the subflooring and a lot of the rotted insulation on the sides of the bathroom (leaky roof) . Anyway, it looks like my bathroom remodel is going to be around 10 or 11 thousand. I wish now I hadn’t ordered the shower kit with the fancy tile.
And then the apples to bananas procedure of reviewing non-like proposals is just as frustrating. Some bring everything. From the paint to the tile to the fixtures and cabinetry. Others point you in you’re own direction for each of these and expect you to know what questions to ask when buying never-before, behind the scenes purchases that are required for a bathroom remodel. And you’re expected to review the costs a la carte vs as a package and come to a whole conclusion as soon as possible ‘cause if you want the remodel done in 5 months, we have to start in 3 and we’re booked for the next 6...wait, what??!?!? 
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