Having an onsite dumpster should be your responsibility if it is something you are going to demand. They aren't cheap. Make suggestions or request a dumpster be included in the bid, but I would never start demanding anything when requesting proposals. They may have their own suggestions. We own a dump trailer and we bring it during demolition to handle the large debris. We have the trailer to avoid having to rent a dumpster on the job. If asked we can share this information, but if you require a dumpster instead we would have to take the time and research getting a dumpster to your house and add in costs we aren't accustomed to adding. That takes time and effort we may just not want to expend to give you a quote. Good contractors are generally very busy.
I’m in the middle of a small bathroom remodel. Shower only-no tub. I thought I was ready for this, but so many things have come up I didn’t count on. I paid $5000 for all supplies and in stock fixtures at Lowes–just basic stuff. I did have to order a shower kit because the builder thought it would save some labor time. It was high–$3200. The builder charges $50 an hour (includes him and his helper). He estimated his costs between 5 and 7 thousand. My house is 35 years old so he has had to do a lot of work to accommodate the new fixtures. I had an old lighted medicine cabinet so he had to rewire for the new lights. My vanity was too high so he had to move the electrical outlet. Because my attic above the shower had moisture in it, he had to vent the shower to the outside. He had to replace all the subflooring and a lot of the rotted insulation on the sides of the bathroom (leaky roof) . Anyway, it looks like my bathroom remodel is going to be around 10 or 11 thousand. I wish now I hadn’t ordered the shower kit with the fancy tile.
I have a miserably small master bath with a particle board subfloor (house built 1969), so I must guy it. I bought toilet made for small bathrooms, and plan to pull the cabinet sink, replace with pedestal, raise storage like lighted bulkhead, demolish tile, and widen doorway from 28" to 32". I might gain 6" from tile removal alone, plus but another 6" on entrance with cabinet sink removal. Since large expense is in demolition, I could do that. But, install showers is tricky given the drain leveling so I'll hire a pro for that. Question: gutting, updating and repairing master bath is necessary, but to what extent should I go i, terms of resizing, which would entail bumping out wall into adjoining small room, which then adds expense of finishing that where window placement restricts encroachment. It's a nice older brick house that I bought before I realized the made of lapses and oversights by the home inspector (who also is a local top police official in a town with highly subjective law enforcement). I need to fix, list, well and leave. Any thoughts (and prayers much appreciated).
I can't even get anyone to look and give an estimate to complete a bathroom remodel- just the bathtub/shower part has to be done as the last person who was doing it died- the rest is complete and have all the items and materials already and paid for. once they hear that they are no longer intrested- what do they expect? me to let them rip out what was already done and repay and redone everything all over again so they get more money? and throw out brand new imported Travertine and Spanish tile?
A punitive approach to what could be unforseen and atypical delays may be a bad idea. I would suggest offering a bonus for the job being completed early rather than a penalty for it being delayed. If material is ordered, we can't make it arrive faster if something delays the shipment. We recently ordered a bathtub requested by a customer. It was promised by our supplier for a Wednesday delivery. Bad weather hit Texas and it just didn't leave the warehouse until the following Monday. It blew up our schedule for the project and it wasn't anyone's fault or mistake. If we have an employee critical to the project get sick or injured, we may not be able to get things done as originally scheduled. Jobs can get off schedule for a lot of reasons outside the contractor's control. Charging them for those things is likely to turn them away.
I can't even get anyone to look and give an estimate to complete a bathroom remodel- just the bathtub/shower part has to be done as the last person who was doing it died- the rest is complete and have all the items and materials already and paid for. once they hear that they are no longer intrested- what do they expect? me to let them rip out what was already done and repay and redone everything all over again so they get more money? and throw out brand new imported Travertine and Spanish tile?
If someone was to come at us with their own additional contract, we would probably decide that we had given them enough of our time and move on. As Nick mentions below, the contractors reputation is the one on the line. They have every reason to do right by you. The crooks of the world generally don't have a reputation to stand on, and as a customer it is your job to research who you are hiring. If you can't find anything about them, they probably aren't who you want to be dealing with. If they ask for money upfront, they probably aren't running a stable outfit. We never take a penny upfront. We collect when the job is fully complete even when we are working on weeks long projects.
Between the two options, pick up one tile design that suits your necessity and budget. Remember to put forward safety for your children in this point. In case your budget is limited, you can partially change the tile. Determine which part of the bathroom that needs new, safer tiles. This will definitely save more money compared to overall tile changing.
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