It's so competitive out there. I am a Long Island contractor and I be realized lately that clients give you an impression when you give them there costs that you are doing something wrong. I've been in this Busines about 20 years and that avg cost is right there. Also homeowners should also realize if us contractors are using subs for our plumbing and electrical our costs are hire than the guy doing all the work himself. I only used licensed contractors for all my remodeling work.
I have a miserably small master bath with a particle board subfloor (house built 1969), so I must guy it. I bought toilet made for small bathrooms, and plan to pull the cabinet sink, replace with pedestal, raise storage like lighted bulkhead, demolish tile, and widen doorway from 28" to 32". I might gain 6" from tile removal alone, plus but another 6" on entrance with cabinet sink removal. Since large expense is in demolition, I could do that. But, install showers is tricky given the drain leveling so I'll hire a pro for that. Question: gutting, updating and repairing master bath is necessary, but to what extent should I go i, terms of resizing, which would entail bumping out wall into adjoining small room, which then adds expense of finishing that where window placement restricts encroachment. It's a nice older brick house that I bought before I realized the made of lapses and oversights by the home inspector (who also is a local top police official in a town with highly subjective law enforcement). I need to fix, list, well and leave. Any thoughts (and prayers much appreciated).
We'll take a deeper dive into current bathroom trends later on, but one such is adding modern metallic features. Luckily, updating your hardware is an effortless way to add visual interest and style to any room. However, if you prefer standard hardware and don’t plan on selling anytime soon, just know that you have to live with the update. Don’t add something if you’re going to be miserable using it. While it could bring in more money down the line, the update is simply not worth it.

A DIY demo does still require some planning. For one, you'll need the right tools: likely a sledgehammer, a large crowbar, a pry bar, and an old claw hammer you don't mind ruining. Make sure you know what's behind the walls—especially electrical wiring and water pipes—before you start swinging. Finally, don't assume your demo won't cost anything. In addition to tools, you'll probably need to rent a dumpster or hire a hauling service to cart away debris.
The Home Depot is a great place to buy your bathroom essentials and remodeling materials. We also provide top-rated design and installation services for homeowners across America. Besides undergoing full background checks, our hand-selected remodeling experts are local, licensed and insured. The Home Depot also offers a great selection of flexible finance options.
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