Some of the new trends in master bath remodels, according to the NKBA’s 2019 Trend Report, include in-floor heating, app-enabled controls for radiant floors and digital shower valves, floating cabinetry, high-gloss and textured melamine looks, wet rooms with tubs and showers in the same room and a drain in floor and black frames as shower focal points. Transitional-style master bathrooms are currently the most popular bath style at 59% of bathroom remodels, says NKBA, with traditional baths a close second.

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The average cost to gut and demolish a bathroom is $400 to $2,000. Prices depend on the room size, type of materials, which fixtures are being removed, if walls are being demolished, and if any damage is found in the subflooring or inner wall structure. You can DIY to save money, but hire a professional to inspect your electrical wiring and plumbing.
When you use a bold accessory like an animal skin, you need to make sure that it isn't lost in a bunch of other decor elements. This bathroom uses its neutral, modern design to really give space to the zebra skin rug here. And the great thing about this kind of design is that you can change this one decor element as often as you wish, without having to spend thousands remodeling every time.
Bathroom remodels provide 60 to 70 percent resale returns as a home improvement project. However, this project isn’t cheap. It is essential to plan your remodeling ideas ahead of time. Then, hire a remodeling contractor for the job. Ask questions, set realistic expectations, get accurate cost estimates and budgeting from the start. Also spend time learning how to work with a bathroom contractor.
What activities will be done in the various parts of the room? For example, will you require a place to sit and apply makeup? Will the room also house laundry facilities? What activities can be done in a shared space, and which require a private area? Do you prefer separate shower and bath areas? Would you like a tub that accommodates more than one person? Do you want the water closet in its own compartment?
The remodel is needed due to water leakage from the tub surround into the wall cavity. I recommended she get an estimate of extra costs that cannot be foreseen until demolition occurs but would be entailed if the contractor has to do any structural work like putting in new studs and or has to install new insulation. I urged her to get at least an upper ceiling estimate before work begins lest the contractor make her an offer she can't refuse once the room is gutted. I urged her to be flexible on any adjustment to the estimate that can be made only after demolition begins. But I told her to insist that the rest of the estimate be binding. No surprises.

You’ll spend $3,000 to $8,000 on the typical remodel. Anywhere from 40 to 65 percent of a bath upgrade cost comes from labor. However, doing any project yourself means no insurance and added fees if something goes wrong. Hire a professional for any work you’re not comfortable doing, such as the plumbing and electrical. Consider the pros and cons of DIY vs professional bathroom remodeling.
A typical bathroom remodel costs $5,000 to $15,000, with most homeowners spending $120 to $275 per square foot. A typical 5x7 bathroom remodel costs $4,200 to $9,600. Small renovations cost $2,000 to $5,000 and one-day bath or shower remodels from Rebath or Bath Planet run $4,000 to $10,000. Get free estimates from bathroom remodelers near you or view our cost guide below.
A punitive approach to what could be unforseen and atypical delays may be a bad idea. I would suggest offering a bonus for the job being completed early rather than a penalty for it being delayed. If material is ordered, we can't make it arrive faster if something delays the shipment. We recently ordered a bathtub requested by a customer. It was promised by our supplier for a Wednesday delivery. Bad weather hit Texas and it just didn't leave the warehouse until the following Monday. It blew up our schedule for the project and it wasn't anyone's fault or mistake. If we have an employee critical to the project get sick or injured, we may not be able to get things done as originally scheduled. Jobs can get off schedule for a lot of reasons outside the contractor's control. Charging them for those things is likely to turn them away.

I’m in the middle of a small bathroom remodel. Shower only-no tub. I thought I was ready for this, but so many things have come up I didn’t count on. I paid $5000 for all supplies and in stock fixtures at Lowes–just basic stuff. I did have to order a shower kit because the builder thought it would save some labor time. It was high–$3200. The builder charges $50 an hour (includes him and his helper). He estimated his costs between 5 and 7 thousand. My house is 35 years old so he has had to do a lot of work to accommodate the new fixtures. I had an old lighted medicine cabinet so he had to rewire for the new lights. My vanity was too high so he had to move the electrical outlet. Because my attic above the shower had moisture in it, he had to vent the shower to the outside. He had to replace all the subflooring and a lot of the rotted insulation on the sides of the bathroom (leaky roof) . Anyway, it looks like my bathroom remodel is going to be around 10 or 11 thousand. I wish now I hadn’t ordered the shower kit with the fancy tile.
Yeah, I feel your pain. I'm in Alabama, one of the lowest income states in the country, and I got a quote from a "big box" hardware store here. $39,000 -- to remodel a 9 x 12 bathroom. I won't go into the details but I'll tell you that the estimate included $3600 for electrical work. Uhh, we are simply switching out 2 'regular' outlets and putting in $20-dollar GFI outlets. The wiring is fine (I know because I've been in the wall before). So don't go to the "big box" stores unless you want the highest possible estimate (oh, yeah ... I had to pay for the estimate as well).
My so lives in the middle floor of a three story condo building. A few weeks ago, the bathtub drain in the unit above his condo broke and water flowed down the inside of the walls soaking the drywall and destroyed two of the three walls in his tub/ shower unit. I need to estimate the cost of repair in order to make a claim. I have already torn all the walls down to the studs and had a tub surround installed.

If you’re suffering from sticker shock, don’t worry. Bathroom remodeling isn’t all or nothing. You can cut down on bathroom remodel costs by going one step at a time. A bathroom can still benefit from new lighting or ventilation updates followed by a new bathroom vanity or granite countertops. You can always upgrade some features later down the road.
I have a miserably small master bath with a particle board subfloor (house built 1969), so I must guy it. I bought toilet made for small bathrooms, and plan to pull the cabinet sink, replace with pedestal, raise storage like lighted bulkhead, demolish tile, and widen doorway from 28" to 32". I might gain 6" from tile removal alone, plus but another 6" on entrance with cabinet sink removal. Since large expense is in demolition, I could do that. But, install showers is tricky given the drain leveling so I'll hire a pro for that. Question: gutting, updating and repairing master bath is necessary, but to what extent should I go i, terms of resizing, which would entail bumping out wall into adjoining small room, which then adds expense of finishing that where window placement restricts encroachment. It's a nice older brick house that I bought before I realized the made of lapses and oversights by the home inspector (who also is a local top police official in a town with highly subjective law enforcement). I need to fix, list, well and leave. Any thoughts (and prayers much appreciated).
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